Making Chicken Stock and Vegetable Stock

CHICKEN STOCK
If you prefer a slightly deeper flavour, you can brown the bones and the vegetables in a 180°C (160°C fan forced) oven for 20 minutes first, or use a leftover roast chicken carcass. This stock makes a nutritious base for a healing chicken soup or broth, known by some as ‘Jewish Penicillin’ and prescribed by many to chase a head cold away.

makes 1 litre
GF
what you need

2 raw chicken carcasses
1 onion, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 celery stalk, roughly chopped
1 leek, washed and roughly chopped
2 bay leaves
6 stalks of fresh thyme
6 whole black peppercorns
¼ cup (60ml) white wine or 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

what you do
1. Place all the ingredients into a large stockpot (about 6 litre capacity) and cover with 4 litres of cold water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat so the mixture simmers. Ladle off the scum that rises to the top, and discard. Simmer gently for 3-4 hours, until liquid reduces by half.

2. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve. If you like, return the stock to the pot and simmer again, which will reduce the quantity and intensify the flavour even more (this helps with storage space – strongly flavoured stock can then be diluted to taste).

3. Allow the stock to cool, then refrigerate. Any fat will solidify on the surface when the stock is cold, which can then be easily removed or kept as desired. Use as needed in any recipe requiring chicken stock.

 Storage: Chicken stock will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months. Divide your cooled stock into portion sizes you think you will use, and freeze to have on hand when you need it.


VEGETABLE STOCK
This is an all-purpose vegetarian stock, mild in flavour, useful as a vegetarian substitute whenever chicken stock is asked for.

makes about 1 litre
V GF
what you need

1 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, diced
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
4 carrots, diced
2 celery stalks, roughly chopped
1 leek, washed and roughly chopped
4 tomatoes, halved
2 bay leaves
6 stalks of fresh thyme
6 whole black peppercorns

what you do
1. Heat the oil in a large stockpot (about 6 litre capacity). Sauté the onion, garlic, carrot, celery and leek for 3-5 minutes over medium heat, until soft but not coloured.

2. Add the remaining ingredients and cover with 3 litres of cold water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat so the mixture simmers. Ladle off the scum that rises to the top, and discard. Simmer gently for 2-3 hours, until liquid reduces by half.

3. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve. If you like, return the stock to the pot and simmer again, which will reduce the quantity and intensify the flavour even more (this helps with storage space – strongly flavoured stock can then be diluted to taste).

4. Allow the stock to cool, refrigerate. Use as needed in any recipe requiring stock.

 Storage: Vegetable stock will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months. Divide your cooled stock into portion sizes you think you will use, and freeze to have on hand when you need it.

©Jane Grover  
Recipe from Our Delicious Adventure – Recipes and Stories of Food and Travel

Chicken and Vegetable Bone Broth

Chicken and Vegetable Bone Broth

This is a basic healing food – a chicken bone broth, with vegetables and the pickings of meat from the carcasses. It is a meal in a bowl I often cook for those who need healing, particularly when they don’t feel like eating. Bringing warmth, comfort and nutrition, it is an immune boosting meal that is easy on the digestive system.

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Byron Bay Eats

Byron Bay Eats

You've got just one day in Byron Bay - where would you eat?
Recently I was faced with this wonderful opportunity to eat my way around Byron Bay, combined with a healthy dose of exercise in between meals, simply to further stoke the appetite! On a Thursday morning it’s straight to Byron Farmers market for breakfast from The Nomadic Kitchen, and on other days; organic plant-based fare served thoughtfully at FOLK Cafe, or bacon and egg butties, green curry of fish, crispy pork belly roll with Asian pickles and their popular three cheese toastie with homemade mustard pickles are amongst the standard offerings at 100 Mile Table and then a cosy night out with some Argentinian fare on the fire at Barrio

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Slow Cooked Organic Chicken and Brown Rice Congee

Slow Cooked Organic Chicken and Brown Rice Congee

Congee (in Asian cooking) is a broth or porridge made from rice. In China, it is traditionally a breakfast dish, a plain white rice congee, most often served with side dishes, sometimes a fried egg. My version, which was inspired by the delicious congee served daily at Bread and Circus Wholefood Canteen in Alexandria, NSW, incorporates, home-made organic chicken stock, slow cooked organic chicken and organic brown rice. Creating a deliciously wholesome, easy to digest, comfort food - best eaten anytime of the day or night!

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Double Chocolate and Quinoa Muffins

Chocolate and Quinoa Muffins.jpg

DOUBLE CHOCOLATE AND QUINOA MUFFINS
These wholesome gluten-free muffins will deliver you double the chocolate taste, with the nourishment of quinoa flour, almond meal and natural yoghurt to sustain you. I like to make mine large, giving you six decent sized muffins, but they will work just as well smaller, giving you a dozen from this recipe.

makes 6 large or 12 medium
V GF
what you need
125g butter,
¾ cup (115g) rapadura sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
1 cup (100g) almond meal
1 cup (120g) quinoa flour
2 tbsp cocoa
1 tsp gluten-free baking powder
½ cup (125ml) natural yoghurt
100g dark chocolate pieces

what you do
1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan forced) and lightly grease 6 large (160ml) or 12 medium (80ml) muffin tins.
2. Using electric beaters, beat the butter and sugar until light and creamy. Add the eggs and vanilla bean paste and beat to combine. Add the remaining ingredients except the chocolate pieces and mix well.
3. Spoon the mixture evenly into prepared muffin tins. For larger muffins use a ½ cup measure per muffin, for smaller muffins a ¼ cup per muffin. Evenly disperse the dark choc pieces between all muffins, poking them into the top of the batter.
4. Bake large muffins for 30 minutes, or medium muffins for 20 minutes or until skewer comes out clean when inserted into the centre of the muffin. Lift out onto a wire rack to cool.

Note: It is doable and worthwhile to make your own almond meal. Process ¾ cup (100g) whole raw almonds to produce the required 1 cup of almond meal. Left over almond meal is best stored in the refrigerator in airtight glass jar.

Storage: To freeze muffins wrap in non-stick baking paper, then place into an airtight snap lock bag with the excess air expelled.

©Jane Grover  
Recipe from Our Delicious Adventure – Recipes and Stories of Food and Travel