Chicken San Choy Bau


CHICKEN SAN CHOY BAU
Fresh, light and fragrant, this is a leaner and less oily version of the traditional Asian dish.

 serves 6
what you need
2 tbsp sesame oil
1 onion, finely diced
500g chicken mince
2 garlic cloves, crushed
3cm piece ginger, peeled and finely grated
2 tbsp tamari or soy sauce
230g can water chestnuts, drained, finely diced
1 red capsicum, finely diced
5 green shallots, finely chopped
330ml bottle ginger beer
6 medium Iceberg lettuce leaves, chilled
1 green shallot, finely shredded, to serve

what you do
1. Heat a large frying pan or wok over high heat.  Add the sesame oil, onion and chicken mince, and stir-fry for 5-7 minutes, until the onion is soft and chicken mince changes colour. Break up any lumps of mince with a wooden spoon as it cooks.
2. Add the garlic, ginger, tamari & water chestnuts; mix well. Stir in the capsicum, shallots and ginger beer. Cook for a further 5-10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the liquid reduces and thickens.
3. Cool slightly, and serve spooned into the iceberg lettuce leaves, topped with finely shredded shallot.

GF option: Use wheat-free tamari or wheat-free soy sauce.

water chestnuts are not actually a nut at all, but an aquatic vegetable that grows in marshes. The name β€˜water chestnut’ comes from the fact that it resembles a chestnut in shape and coloring. Indigenous to Southeast Asia, it has been cultivated in China since ancient times. Unless you live in an area where they are farmed locally, it will be difficult to obtain them fresh, however canned water chestnuts are readily available in supermarkets. They add a delicious crunch to dishes and are a good source of potassium and fibre. They are low in sodium, and fat is virtually non-existent.

 tamari is a Japanese-style soy sauce, available from most supermarkets. It is lower in wheat content than regular soy sauce, and is also available in a wheat-free version.

Β© Recipe - Naked Food - the way food was meant to be by Jane Grover